Virus That Killed Kansas Man Identified

Virus That Killed Kansas Man Identified

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The CDC has reported that the death of the man in Kansas who was bitten by a tick last spring owes to a newly discovered virus called Bourbon. The virus remained unidentified for so long because of the absence of any medical history or predominance. The virus has been named after the county in Kansas where the man, who got infected with the virus, lived. The man was reportedly healthy before getting infected. After being bitten by a tick, the man died within a few days due to a related illness.

The Kansas State epidemiologist, Charles Hunt said “We are unaware about this virus, and hence it is of due importance to find details pertaining to public health perspective.” The research team revealed that the infected person was a healthy man, below 50 years of age. A fat tick came and sat on his shoulder while he was working outdoors in East Kansas and that was when he got infected. The person started feeling weaker within few days and began suffering from diarrhea and nausea. Eventually he was gripped by fever, chills and muscle aches.

The doctor anticipated that he was suffering from Lyme disease and an antibiotic named Doxycycline was prescribed which treats tick borne infections. Gradually the man began losing consciousness and was hospitalized. Blood tests for Rocky Mountain fever and Lyme disease furnished negative results but his sickness worsened. As a consequence his heart and kidneys failed and he died 11 days after he was first ill.

All kinds of tests revealed negative results, however, Olga Kosoy, CDC microbiologist noticed a multiplying virus in the patient’s blood sample. Advanced molecular detection was used by Amy Lamber, Olga’s colleague, who also sequenced the genome of the virus. The researchers admitted that the virus was never seen before. This summer scientists are planning to look for ticks, mosquitoes or animals which are carrying the virus. They are also trying to identify antibiotics that may be effective against Bourbon Virus.

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Carolyn Martin has done her Masters in Chemical and Pharmaceutical Science and has been a part of The American Council on Science and Health, New York. She has been working as a chemist in drug discovery at several places for more than 11 years. Being graduated from the Virginia University, she has utilised her knowledge to explore the world of healthcare and medicines, so that she can contribute her portion for the society. Her writing style is heavily influenced with her background, where she brings out the best healthcare subjects along with the popular remedies, which can help the readers at times of need. Email : carolyn@dailysciencejournal.com