Study Reveals Influence of Underwater Volcanic Eruptions on Climate

Study Reveals Influence of Underwater Volcanic Eruptions on Climate

2293
20
SHARE

Scientists are studying about the impact of volcanoes deep within the sea and it has been revealed that they have a prominent influence on climate change. Sea-floor volcanoes expelling molten rock have been found to be associated with historical changes in the orbit and environment of the Earth. According to a scientist at the Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Edward Baker, “We don’t usually think of eruptions as being affected by very small changes-astronomical changes and sea levels rising and falling, and the Earth spinning around the sun at different distances. It’s another way of understanding how the Earth works.”

Geophysicist, Maya Tolstoy from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory explained that such volcanic eruptions were once thought to be slow and steady but they actually erupt in the form of bursts, lasting from two weeks to 100,000 years and having a regular pattern. Owing to their steady state, these deep-sea volcanoes were assumed to have small impact. However, volcanoes at mid-ocean ridges are influenced by both large and small forces and a closer look at their impact is required.

The new study was carried out with the aim of determining the frequency of underwater volcanic eruptions and the factors behind them. Tolstoy found that these volcanoes were associated with the changes in the movement of Earth around the Sun. These changes take place in 100,000 year cycles, leading to ice ages and warm periods. Among the factors responsible for worldwide climate change, the underwater eruptions are not considered. The study also discovered that the eruptions coincided with low tides.

During the ice ages, the sea level was lower as the sea water converted into ice. The low level of sea was also accompanied by more volcanic activity in the sea. According to the researchers, the icecaps building on land increases the pressure on volcanoes which in turn suppress eruptions. Melting of ice leads to increased volcanic eruptions on land. Carbon dioxide expelled by the volcanoes causes warming of the atmosphere which significantly influence the climate. The warming air also causes further volcanic eruptions.

In case of both land and sea, sufficient pressure on the volcano results in limited volcanic activity. When the pressure reduces, due to melting of ice on land or low tides in the ocean, the volcanoes start erupting. Evidences of a 100,000 year cycle in seafloor maps of the Pacific have been found by the researchers. When the sea level was low, large hills of lava formed on the East Pacific Rise. Volcanic activity increased due to low water pressure on the ridge. The patterns of volcanic activity were found to be associated with the ice sheets formation and melting approximately every 100,000 years for the last two to three million years. In every 100,000 years, a cycle of the Earth’s orbit gets more or less elliptical and the patterns are paced up. Tolstoy opines that underwater eruptions probably do not just follow the 100,000 year cycle but they might also influence the climate.

SHARE
Previous articleGolden Mussel Threatening to Invade Amazon River
Next articleRed Wine Helps to Burn Fat, Study Suggests

James Hailey a worshipper of life as it comes to him. He enjoys soft music while working on his latest manuscripts spread over his desk and his tablet on hand. His curiosity to observe everything around him and love for writing has propelled him to take up the job of a news journalist. Soon he realised, he enjoyed being at the back seat and editing all those news collected by others. He has been working as a lead news editor for both the digital and print media since the past 8 years. On his spare time he indulges in yoga to calm his hectic life style. He writes on Geology and Earth. Wmail : james@dailysciencejournal.com

  • Thomas Farmer

    More BS!

  • jay

    Tom Farmer,

    Yeah, OK. How would you be the one to validate whether it is BS or not? Are you one of the few geoscientists studying volcanic eruptions at mid-oceanic ridges? I didn’t think so.

    I was reading some of your other comments. You are seriously annoying. You clearly have nothing better to do with your time then to write ridiculous, uneducated comments on news articles. Hope you grow up sometime soon.

    Cheers,

    Jay

  • EmpiricalEvidence

    Round of applause for Jay!

  • Bezukhov

    Now if we can only find a way to blame this on Republicans.

  • AK_User

    Every observation made concerning erupting volcanoes indicates that they lower the temperature of the planet, they do not increase it. CO2 is just one of many elements spewed into the atmosphere by an erupting volcano. Sulfur dioxide and water vapor are far more abundant during an eruption than CO2. While water vapor is a greenhouse gas, like CO2, sulfur dioxide is not and actually blocks sunlight. The 1991 Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines lowered the temperature of the planet by 2°F for an entire year after the eruption, and by 1°F for a year after that. At no time has any volcanic activity anywhere ever been attributed to increasing the planet’s temperature.

  • LessGovernment76

    You are only accounting for land based volcanic activity. When the clouds of debris actually block and reflect sunlight from the planet. These are under water and therefore do not have ash clouds that block and reflect the Sun’s heat. The reason none have been attributed to heating before is because of lying scientists busy blaming man for government taxation purposes. Many geologists that study volcanic activity have disagreed for years but are silenced and ridiculed because such claims detract from the taxation agenda.

  • tin man

    For a science journal, this article is remarkably data-free.

  • eAbyss

    Sulfer dioxide, not ash, is the main cause of cooling due to volcanic activity and it is a gas. Both sulfer dioxide and carbon dioxide are water soluble though which means they are just being added to the oceans, not the atmosphere.

  • eAbyss

    Sorry, try again. Carbon dioxide is water soluble. Underwater volcanoes would add carbon dioxide to the oceans, NOT the atmosphere.

  • eAbyss

    He’s right though. CO2 is water soluble and would be absorbed by the oceans before it hit the atmosphere so therefore BS.

  • boscoroni

    Unable to actually understand the article, I see.

  • Thomas Farmer

    Jay, I offered an opinion, just as you did. Mine was short, focused and to the point. Yours was just the opposite.

  • Guest

    eAbyss,

    You seem to have a very limited knowledgebase on the fundamental principles dealing with solubility and saturation. My best guess is your not well educated in science.

    CO2 is not simply “water soluable”. Sure it is to some extent soluable, yes. So are other elements/compounds, such as Au or Cu in seawater. The question is what is the budget of CO2 released from mid-oceabing ridges and what is the solubility of CO2? One must also address if this affected by temperature and/or pressure? CO2 will reach a saturation point, where is is no longer soluable in H2O, therefore transporting its self as a gaseous species through the water (as it is less dense). Therefore reaching the surface and contributing to the atmospheric budget of CO2.

    Sorry… Try again.

    Jay

  • jay

    eAbyss,

    You seem to have a very limited knowledgebase on the fundamental principles dealing with solubility and saturation. My best guess is your not well educated in science.

    CO2 is not simply “water soluable”. Sure it is to some extent soluable, yes. So are other elements/compounds, such as Au or Cu in seawater. The question is what is the budget of CO2 released from mid-oceabing ridges and what is the solubility of CO2? One must also address if this affected by temperature and/or pressure? CO2 will reach a saturation point, where is is no longer soluable in H2O, therefore transporting its self as a gaseous species through the water (as it is less dense). Therefore reaching the surface and contributing to the atmospheric budget of CO2.

    Sorry… Please try again.

    Jay

  • jay

    eAbyss,

    You seem to have a very limited knowledgebase on the fundamental principles dealing with solubility and saturation. My best guess is your not well educated in science.

    CO2 is not simply “water soluable”. Sure it is to some extent soluable, yes. So are other elements/compounds, such as Au or Cu in seawater. The question is what is the budget of CO2 released from mid-oceabing ridges and what is the solubility of CO2? One must also address if this affected by temperature and/or pressure? CO2 will reach a saturation point, where is is no longer soluable in H2O, therefore transporting its self as a gaseous species through the water (as it is less dense). Therefore reaching the surface and contributing to the atmospheric budget of CO2.

    Sorry. Try again.

    Jay

  • eAbyss

    Sorry, I didn’t realize you were a troll.

  • eAbyss

    Wow Jay. Trolling on your account and on a guest account. Too bad you’re not capable of doing more than a cut and paste job.

    Have a nice day.

  • eAbyss

    LOL. I guess I’ll just go look for air bubbles to find underwater volcanoes then… The oceans have not reached their saturation point and currents and tides guarantee that localized areas won’t build to that point either.

  • jay

    Hahahahahaha

  • jay

    Nice attempt.