Planned Telescope Could Produce 1,000 Times Sharper Images than Hubble

Planned Telescope Could Produce 1,000 Times Sharper Images than Hubble

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Aragoscope is the new space observatory which has been proposed by the researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder and the researchers have claimed that it might perform better than the Hubble Space Telescope of NASA. Aragoscope would be capturing 1,000 times sharper images than Hubble.  The telescope has been named after the French physicist Dominique François Jean Arago, the first man to detect diffracted light waves bending around a disk. Aragoscope would include an orbiting space telescope and an opaque disk in front of it.

Anthony Harness, student at The University of Colorado Boulder and one of the team member stated “Traditionally, space telescopes have essentially been monolithic pieces of glass like the Hubble Space Telescope, but the heavier the space telescope, the more expensive the cost of the launch.” According to the research team, the diffracted light waves from the target object would bend around the edge of the disk and would converge in a central location. Following this, the light would be sent to the telescope for getting extremely high-resolution photographs of the targeted space bodies.

As per the University of Colorado Boulder scientists, with the help of Aragoscope the scientists would be able to image space objects like black hole ‘event horizons’ and plasma swaps between stars. By pointing it towards the Earth, it could be used to image rabbit-sized objects which would be helpful in finding campers lost in the mountains. Professor Webster Cash, the team leader of the project, and his colleagues have informed NASA about the development of this novel telescope system. It is one of the 12 proposed projects which have received Phase One funding by NASA’s Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) program last June.

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Brian Thompson has been a science journalist since past 15 years and continues his journey with the Astronomy, Space and Social Science changes happened so far in this industry. He has worked for various magazines as the chief editor. He has experience in writing and editing across every sector of the media involving magazines, newspapers, online as well as for leading television shows for the past 15 years. His style of presentation is both crisp yet captivating for the audience. Email : brian@dailysciencejournal.com