Pizza Makes the Diet of Kids Overloaded With Calories

Pizza Makes the Diet of Kids Overloaded With Calories

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Pizza introduces a significantly more amount of calories, fat and sodium in the body and too much consumption of it might lead to obesity as per a new research. Researchers tried to find out the amount of pizza consumed by kids and adolescents and for this they analyzed the diets of children aged 2 to 11 years and teens aged 12 to 19 years during the years between 2003 and 2010. It was found that on the days when kids eat pizza, it makes up about 20% of their daily calories. And another prominent part of the research is that those calories do not come from the veggies on the pizza.

Throughout the study the overall consumption of pizza didn’t decline and between 2009 and 2010 pizza was found to be the second highest contributor to children’s solid fat intake from schools and fast-food restaurants. A number of kids have pizza in school cafeterias. However, those obtained from school cafeterias are expected to be a bit healthier owing to USDA’s nationwide nutrition standards for school lunch which has improved the nutritional content of all lunch offerings.

Nutritional content of pizza from two undisclosed top national chains have also been evaluated by the researchers and results show that between 2003 and 2010 they had a high increase in sodium for thin crust cheese pizzas. The researchers also highlighted that a number of fast food restaurants selling regular, full calorie pizza are located near schools and low-income neighborhoods and the children getting pizza from these outlets consume much more calories. Researchers opine that kids must be informed about the huge amount of empty nutrition that comes with pizza which can contribute significantly to obesity.

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Mable Watson Originally belongs to Dallas, Texas now settled in South Dakota. Mable graduated from University Of North Texas. She works like no other writer would ever imagine. She scans the headlines and notes only a single word, later on works for hours. Everything she has scanned once goes into her brain and she has trained herself that way. Being a lead editor she has worked in the Social Science arena for almost 9 years. Her writing style is simple yet so different from others that you can’t help appreciating. Email : mable@dailysciencejournal.com