Lunar Mission To Drill Hole is Raising Serious Money on Kickstarter

Lunar Mission To Drill Hole is Raising Serious Money on Kickstarter

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Crowd-funding doesn’t get any bigger than this. A British team, through Kickstarter, is hoping to raise enough to fund a mission to moon, to conduct drilling operation and leave a permanent base.

A project called ‘Lunar Mission One’ which is based in UK, hopes to raise $ 940284 through donations. Surprisingly as of Wednesday it has raised $50148 already through 300 backers. And even though the mission does not take off for at least the next 10 years, this is positive development for the British team. The mission will need around 4.7 billion dollars, which the team hopes to raise through other avenues.

The mission which is the brain child of David Iron, a former Royal Navy Engineering Officer and a financial consultant, also has the backing from many eminent space scientists and even UK Parliamentary Space Committee. David Iron has worked on more than 150 technology and space projects including Britain’s military satellite navigation program ‘Skynet.’

“Governments are finding it increasingly difficult to fund space exploration that is solely for the advancement of human knowledge and understanding as opposed to commercial return,” said Mr Iron, the CEO of Lunar Missions Ltd.
“Lunar Mission One will make a huge contribution to our understanding of the origins of our planet and the Moon and will inspire a generation to learn more about space, science and engineering – in the same way that my generation was inspired by the Apollo Moon landings.”

Once this mission reaches moon, it hopes to bury a time capsule, which will contain the digital DNA of those who donated money as well as archives of Earth’s history. The mission also hopes to study Moon’s South Pole and build a permanent base there.

By 2017 the team is hoping to decide and finalize on a launching date, which they hope will be around 2024. The scientists hope to conduct the testing around 2022 and 2023. The final design of the spacecraft will be finalized by 2018.

“Lunar Mission One will finally allow us to get below the surface of the Moon and answer some very important questions.” said Professor Alan Smith, Head of the Department of Space and Climate Physics, UCL, “Lunar Mission One is a brilliant project which deserves to succeed.”

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Floyd Wilson has worked as the chief of the editing team for 9 years in the media industry. He has got his MFA in creative writing along with multimedia journalism degree. Both the degrees have been a learning curve in his life that made him understand the world of different media including news and print media. He is a genius when you speak of the latest News in the market, without a blink of an eye His obsession for writing has landed him the job of writing about Astronomy And Space at its best. Email : floyd@dailysciencejournal.com