Curiosity Found Nitrogen on Mars

Curiosity Found Nitrogen on Mars

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Analysis of the samples collected by Curiosity rover has revealed that Mars has nitrogen, in a form which can be used by living organisms. Nitrogen is an essential element for life forms and is used in the building blocks of larger molecules like DNA and RNA. However, the nitrogen found on Mars does not indicate the presence of life on the planet. The research team suggests that the nitrates which have been discovered are ancient and probably formed due to non-biological processes like meteorite impacts and lightning in the distant past.

However, some of the ancient features like dry riverbeds and minerals support the theory that Mars once had the conditions which support life. Such evidences have been found especially at the Gale crater which was possibly habitable billions of years ago. Jennifer Stern of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center said “Finding a biochemically accessible form of nitrogen is more support for the ancient Martian environment at Gale Crater being habitable.”

The Rocknest sample which helped to discover nitrogen is a combination of dust blown from distant regions on Mars and suggests that nitrates are widespread across the planet. Other evidences which suggest that the Red Planet was probably habitable once include fresh water, potential energy sources to drive metabolism in simple organisms and key chemical elements required by life like carbon.

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Floyd Wilson has worked as the chief of the editing team for 9 years in the media industry. He has got his MFA in creative writing along with multimedia journalism degree. Both the degrees have been a learning curve in his life that made him understand the world of different media including news and print media. He is a genius when you speak of the latest News in the market, without a blink of an eye His obsession for writing has landed him the job of writing about Astronomy And Space at its best. Email : floyd@dailysciencejournal.com