Claim about Cosmic Finding Abandoned by Scientists

Claim about Cosmic Finding Abandoned by Scientists

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Last March scientists had revealed some interesting facts about the early universe but now they have abandoned their claim. According to the original announcement, scientists had gathered evidences which showed that just a split-second after its birth, the universe ballooned rapidly through a phenomenon known as cosmic inflation.

The scientists had performed an experiment called BICEP2 in which they scanned the background radiation of the universe with the aid of their South Pole telescope which revealed that the gravitational waves emitted in the initial moment after the Big Bang had polarized the ancient light and this supported the theory of “cosmic inflation.” Although the idea was widely accepted, the scientists had thought to provide evidences in its favor by discovering a specific trait in the light left over from the very early universe.

Other scientists began doubting the concept soon after the announcement and they opined that foreground dust within our galaxy might also be the reason behind the BICEP2 “signal.”  A new analysis was started by the BICEP2 team in collaboration with the scientists of European Space Agency’s Planck spacecraft. The research team has recently concluded that the signal was received probably due to dust.

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Brian Thompson has been a science journalist since past 15 years and continues his journey with the Astronomy, Space and Social Science changes happened so far in this industry. He has worked for various magazines as the chief editor. He has experience in writing and editing across every sector of the media involving magazines, newspapers, online as well as for leading television shows for the past 15 years. His style of presentation is both crisp yet captivating for the audience. Email : brian@dailysciencejournal.com